matociquala: (bear by san)
A draft, a veritable draft.

3300 words today to finish off my untitled Shirley Jackson inspired SF story, which was supposed to be 7000 words and is 9500. AND IT'S DONE DONE DONE.

Well, okay, not done.

Because not revised, and I am waiting to hear back from an editor on how much it might need to be cut.

I FEEL LIKE [livejournal.com profile] scott_lynch! I'm MAD WITH POWER.

BUT DONE.

Also, O HAI THERE KAREN IS BACK! A new novella from Tor.com, edited by [livejournal.com profile] casacorona, entitled Stone Mad!
matociquala: (hustle mickey worrying)

I was asked what I published last year. And of course I'm having server/host issues, so I can't go check my trusty website, which is what I would normally do.

...which is probably why I am being asked, come to think of it.

So! A list, a veritable list! A list, I say!

Novels, 2015:

Karen Memory
An Apprentice to Elves
(with [livejournal.com profile] truepenny)


Novelettes, 2015:

"The Heart's Filthy Lesson," Old Venus, Dozois and Martin eds
"And the Balance in Blood," Uncanny


Short Stories, 2015

"In Libres," Uncanny
"Margin of Survival" The End Has Come, Adams and Howey, eds
"The Bone War," The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction
"Skin in the Game," Future Visions


matociquala: (writing eternal sky rog)



My short story, "The Bone War," is now available in the September/October issue of F&SF! It's also the featured story in the free Kindle sample for this month!   

In other news, [livejournal.com profile] scott_lynch's neighbors have adopted this lost homing pigeon. (Cue all the jokes about the bird's failure to compass its job, etc.)

matociquala: (criminal minds garcia plan b)
Hello, true believers! I know, I know. It's like I never come around here any more. I've been caught up in travel and work and more travel and more work--but I have some actual exciting announcements to make.

My hopefully amusing short story, "The Bone War," is out in this month's The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, fondly known throughout the genre as "F&SF." The table of contents and some links to reviews are here. It's a Bijou the Artificer story, set in the Eternal Sky world some four hundred years after Range of Ghosts and on a different continent. It is lovingly dedicated to all my academic friends.

Also lovingly dedicated to all my academic friends, my short story "in Libres," available in the May/June issue of Uncanny. I was on a roll this past winter with academic snark stories, apparently.

Pursuant to that, I would like to announce that forthcoming in Year 2 of Uncanny (kickstarter here for subscription and cool premiums), you will see the publication of my novelette "And the Balance in Blood." This is one part more academic snark and one part what happens to AD&D characters when they retire. As one does.

Also recently published, the actual most depressing thing I have ever written (sell it, Bear!), "Margin of Survival," in Volumn 3 of John Joseph Adams and Hugh Howey's The Apocalypse Triptych: The End Has Come.

Whew.

On to more cheerful news!

You may have heard that my writing partner, Sarah Monette, was nominated for literally every single major fantasy genre award this year in her Katherine Addison persona, for The Goblin Emperor. She won the Locus Award for best fantasy novel, and is in the running for the Hugo and World Fantasy awards.

Well, we have finally completed work on the final book in our jointly written Iskryne series, and I am pleased to announce that An Apprentice to Elves will be out in October.



Phew.
matociquala: (sf doctor who meant to be?)
Old Venus comes out on Tuesday.

Old Venus is not your father's retro-futurism. It's the Venus of the pulps, yes, but imagined as if that Venus--swampy, syrupy, paleolithic--had turned out to be real. Something that the evolved science fiction of today could still sink its teeth into. It's a fun, playful, thoughtful anthology including stories by writers ranging from Tobias S. Buckell to Joe Haldeman.



It's netting great reviews, too. (You can read some of the Usual Suspects at that Barnes and Noble link, and here's Russell Letson's take.)

Seriously, this is awesome and you want it.

And now, to try to screw my sick head on and finish this library story.
matociquala: (phil ochs troubador)
The storm is over and the sun came out. Everything is melting, only to freeze again soon. More snow in the forecast. I'll be very surprised if we don't break the record this winter. We're less than seven inches from it now. And that's all since the last week of January.

We have, dear readers, been getting thumped.

But I am having a very good day. For example, I just sold "The Bone War" to F&SF. It's the first fiction I've ever sold to that market! (I did sell them a poem in 2002. It was one of my first pro sales.)

ETA "The Bone War" is an Eternal Sky story set in Messaline between Book of Iron and Bone and Jewel Creatures, and involving Bijou, Brazen, and a rather... large... commission. /ETA

Yesterday I got almost eight pages on "And the Balance in Blood," which has been stalled for a month while I figured out how the hell it ended.  And today I wrote another four pages and finished it. It's done!

Okay, it's a draft. But it's done in draft at least. Here is some Proof of Tea and Writing!

Yesterday:



Tea: An Upton Darjeeling.
Teacup: Blue and white Chinese

Today:



Dog: snoring away the winter
Tea: Still the same Darjeeling
Teacup: The turquoise frankencup.

Oh, and I bought a new car. The Honda is old enough to vote, and just not up to the road conditions we're suffering in the hills of Massachusetts these days, so I'm looking to rehome it with a loving high school student or something. So last week that boy I like and I took ourselves down to a Subaru dealership and, you know, two days of our lives later we came away with a Crosstrek.

I love it to death already. And the fact that we got another six inches of snow last night is a contributing factor.

It syncs with my phone. I'm just saying.

And there's cover art for An Apprentice to Elves!



(I also got mugged by two pages of a novel I'm totally not writing because I am writing other things now. Ahem. They were good pages, though.)

I need a title for the Library Story. That--and revisions on the Worldspinner project--are next in the queue.

La.
matociquala: (sf star trek horta/spock)
Hey, look what came in the mail! It's a copy of Old Venus, edited by George R.R. Martin and Gardner Dozois. This awesome anthology is a followup to last year's Old Mars, and it's made of Eleanor Arnason, David Brin, Tobias S. Buckell, Michael Cassutt, Joe Haldeman, Matthew Hughes, Gwyneth Jones, Joe R. Landsdale, Stephen Leigh, Paul McAuley, Ian McDOnald, Garth Nyx, Mike Resnick, Allen M. Steele, Lavie Tidhar, and meeeeee.

Yeah, I'll never be over typing lists like that.



(Tea today: Stash Sunny Orange Ginger
Teacup today: Still White Nile, but I might change later.)

Old Venus goes on sale March 3rd, but you can pre-order now. As you can probably guess, it's tales of a classic SF swampy Venus, reimagined through a modern lens. I chose to do my story, "The Heart's Filthy Lesson," as if the Venera probes had borne out a living Venus with a rich atmosphere, but with as much reinforcing actual modern science as possible otherwise.

(The art that's serving as my desktop is copyright Dan Zollinger--it's the banner for my Gotham Jazz Storium world.)

And now, before I go off to the gym to run on the treadmill, because I'm being a wimp about the snow, some pretty pictures of sunrise yesterday:





And the verrrry impressive icicles at my vet:



Now, to exercise, and then I have more guest blogging and interview questions to do, and a plot problem to solve so I can finish this post-apocalyptic sargasso lighthouse story tomorrow.
matociquala: (writing leri loki)
Wheeee! Gollancz has posted the UK covers for the Wetwired (Jenny Casey) books, and that means I get to show them to you now.

The UK editions are out in April in ebook. These are the author's preferred editions, with some problems fixed. 

Print editions if sales warrant, so you know what to do.

matociquala: (criminal minds morgan garcia gotcha)
As I write this, Karen Memory is the #12 steampunk book on Amazon. I learned this morning that it's already been sent back for a rush reprint. because the first run sold out, and honestly, I'd love for Karen to be the #1 steampunk book on Amazon. So if you are an Amazon shopper, and you were planning on buying the book anyway,

If you are not an Amazon shopper and you want to read Karen Memory, please do order it through your library, preferred online retailer, or--best of all!--local retailer!

It formally goes on sale tomorrow, though there are scattered reports of it being on some bookstore shelves already.



You can read an excerpt here.

Yesterday I also learned that I had four things on the Locus recommended reading list for 2014.

Those four things are The Steles of the Sky, "The Hand is Quicker," "Covenant," and "This Chance Planet."

[livejournal.com profile] truepenny's glorious The Goblin Emperor is on there, too, and [livejournal.com profile] scott_lynch's delightful "A Year and a Day in Old Theradane."

And a lot of other really awesome stuff as well.

And [livejournal.com profile] stillsostrange and I ran 13.1 miles in Galveston yesterday, and then went out dancing last night with Austin friends.

matociquala: (david bowie realism _ truepenny)

Gardner Dozois has announced the Table of Contents for his THIRTY-SECOND annual YBSF.

I may be in it twice.

This may make up for the cold I'm nursing.


The Year’s Best Science Fiction, Thirty-Second Annual Collection,
Edited by Gardner Dozois

The Fifth Dragon, Ian McDonald (Reach for Infinity)
The Rider, Jérôme Cigut (F&SF)
The Days of the War, as Red as Blood, as Dark as Bile, Aliette de Bodard (Subterranean Online)
The Burial of Sir John Mawe at Cassini, Chaz Brenchley (Subterranean Online)
The Regular, Ken Liu (Upgraded)
The Woman from the Ocean, Karl Bunker (Asimov's)
Shooting the Apocalypse, Paolo Bachigalupi (The End Is Nigh)
Weather, Susan Palwick (Clarkesworld)
The Hand Is Quicker, Elizabeth Bear (The Book of Robert Silverberg)
The Man Who Sold the Moon, Cory Doctorow (Hieroglyph)
Vladimir Chong Chooses To Die, Lavie Tidhar (Analog)
Beside the Damned River, D.J. Cockburn (Interzone)
The Colonel, Peter Watts (Tor.com)
Entanglement, Vandana Singh (Hieroglyph)
White Curtain, Pavel Amnuel (F&SF)
Slipping, Lauren Beukes (Twelve Tomorrows)
Passage of Earth, Michael Swanwick (Clarkesworld)
Amicae Aeternum, Ellen Klages (Reach for Infinity)
In Babelsberg, Alastair Reynolds (Reach for Infinity)
Sadness, Timons Esaias (Analog)
West to East, Jay Lake (Subterranean Online)
Grand Jeté (The Great Leap), Rachel Swirsky (Subterranean Online)
Covenant, Elizabeth Bear (Hieroglyph)
Jubilee, Karl Schroeder (Tor.com)
Los Pirates del Mar de Plastico (Pirates of the Plastic Ocean), Paul Graham Raven (Twelve Tomorrows)
Red Light, and Rain, Gareth L. Powell (Solaris Rising 3)
Coma Kings, Jessica Barber (Lightspeed)
The Prodigal Son, Allen M. Steele (Asimov's)
God Decay, Rich Larson (Upgraded)
Blood Wedding, Robert Reed (Asimov's)
The Long Haul, from the Annals of Transportation, The Pacific Monthly, May 2009, Ken Liu (Clarkesworld)
Shadow Flock, Greg Egan (Coming Soon Enough)
Thing and Sick, Adam Roberts (Solaris Rising 3)
Communion, Mary Anne Mohanraj (Clarkesworld)
Someday, James Patrick Kelly (Asimov's)
Yesterday’s Kin, Nancy Kress (Tachyon)


I see three Hieroglyph and three Reach for Infinity stories on that list, along with two apiece for Upgraded and Solaris Rising 3. Do I detect a brewing Best Anthology award rivathelry for next year?

Which give me elegant segue to my obligatory end of year shilling!

So here's what I published in 2014.

Among the short fiction, I have to say, I'm particularly proud of "This Chance Planet" and "Covenant." In case anyone was wondering.


Short Fiction:

“This Chance Planet,” Tor.com, October 22, 2014 (Ellen Datlow, ed.)
“The Hand is Quicker”, The Book of Silverberg, Gardner Dozois, ed., 2014
“You’ve Never Seen Everything,” The End is Now, John Joseph Adams and Hugh Howey, ed., 2014
“Terroir,” Harvest Season, Bill Roper, ed., November 2014
“Covenant,” Hieroglyph,Kathryn Cramer and Edward Finn, ed., October 2014
“No Place to Dream, But a Place to Die,” Upgraded, Neil Clarke ed., September 2014
“Madame Damnable’s Sewing Circle,” Dead Man’s Hand, John Joseph Adams, ed., 2014


Shadow Unit:

"Dark Leader," with Emma and Will
"Asylum," with Chelsea
"Something's Gotta Eat T. Rexes," with Emma and Steve


Novels:

Steles of the Sky, Tor (edited by Beth Meacham)
One-Eyed Jack, Prime Books (edited by Paula Guran)

matociquala: (bad girls  mae west)
I have a new hat!



A pretty stylin' hat, too. My mother made it for me.

Also, Amazon seems to think that the publication date for An Apprentice to Elves is October 13, 2015. They might even be right!!

In other news, today was mostly setting up ebook pubs of Whiskey and Water, which is now available again through Smashwords right now, and will be going up at B&N, Amazon, the Apple store, etc, shortly.

Tea today: Upton rose congou
Teacup today: still stuck on the Royal Doulton irises, because they're pretty. With my squid mug in the background, because it had coffee in it. cooooffeeeee.

matociquala: (criminal minds diana reid crazy)
My Moscow Metro dog organlegging story, "This Chance Planet," is live at Tor.com!



(I would have mentioned it yesterday, but I was on airplanes.)

And now that I've dropped a giant graphic in your internets and presumably have your attention (art by Robert Hunt), it's time to reveal some titles! The titling gnomes have finally prevailed in their epic battle with der Fehlerteufel, and Eternal Sky 4-6 (collectively known as The Lotus Kingdom) have grown beautiful titles ripe for harvesting.

Or something.

So without further ado, let me introduce you to my next three fantasy novels.

The Stone in the Skull

The Red-Stained Wings

The Origin of Storms
matociquala: (literature sally and encyclopedia)

Oh, adventure.

Dear Reader, it's been a dratted long time since I did any serious updating, for which I apologize. Let's just say it's been busy, and I'll provide a few highlights to convince you.

To start with, here's a fun thing. I will be appearing at a couple of the Project Hieroglyph book launch events September 30th-October 2nd, in New York City and Washington DC. Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future itself is of course available at fine book retailers on and off line, everywhere.

Also, here's my Hieroglyph story up at Slate: "Covenant."

Here's what I will be doing this week:

Project Hieroglyph Book Launch and Celebration
Tumblr and ASU Center for Science and the Imagination
Tuesday, Sept 30th, 2013 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
NY, NY

Register for free tickets here.


Can We Imagine Our Way to a Better Future?
Keck Center of the National Academies
500 5th Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
(This event is booked full, but there will be a live webcast.)

In other news, I finished my third official half marathon on September 13th--the Milford CT Gulf Beach half, which was lovely and I felt like I did well in, despite being twenty pounds up from where I was this time last year (blame a hard winter, too much convention, and France. You would not believe the subcutaneous layer of cheese and butter from Normandy I still have to haul up walls) and otherwise out of shape from a long summer of hotels and bar food.

Here's the obligatory pre-race shot:



Finish line:



Post-race with swag and new contact lenses.



The Europe trip was lovely, if hectic. And Scott and I were both incredibly giddy by the end of it. Iceland was gorgeous; Normandy was spectacular; Sweden and Finland were fantastic and England was just as I left it, though we saw some new bits this time. NB: I highly recommend tramping the downs on the Isle of Wight.

I have never quite felt so slow-witted as I did at the Worldcon panels. Wow.

Anyway, I did the race in 11:25 miles, finishing in just under 2 and a half hours. Not a PR, but very respectable given my lack of training. (Now I'm working on doing better at the Monster Dash in Minneapolis on October 25th!)

Also, we've been scraping and sanding the porch preparatory to painting. I hope the damned thing magically paints itself before I get home.



Anyway, tl:dr, here are some photos.



One does not simply WALK into London...



Re: what I said about the Isle of Wight.

A Bear in Iceland:



Snails and barnacles:



It's been a good year for the morning glories:



What else? Oh, Omaha Beach and Mont St. Michel are both totally worth a visit, and I have written a couple of stories and some gaming content, and as soon as the Hieroglyph publicity trip is up I'll be diving back into An Apprentice to Elves. That's what I'll be doing at Viable Paradise while my colleagues are all teaching. I feel like I ran a great scam this year.

Here's a blurry photo of Carlos and his perfect hair holding the first copy of One-Eyed Jack I ever personally saw, at Nine Worlds:



And here. Have a fuzzy caterpillar, and the Giant Ridiculous Dog, for his fans, with the shark Sarah Monette sent him for my birthday: ...hey...

 

matociquala: (criminal minds elle lucky)
The final episode of Shadow Unit is live, and I am having a complicated emotional response.

I also have a draft program for LonCon III. And I sold a short story to Asimov's and another one to a Sekrit Projekt.

(There will also be at least one signing at the Gollancz table, and I am hoping for a Kaffeklatsch or Literary Beer or reading, but those have not been assigned yet.)

A Reader's Life During Peak Short Fiction

Friday 12:00 - 13:30

There are now more speculative short stories published than any one person can hope to read -- or even find. So how do fans of the short-form navigate this landscape? With so much ground to cover, how does an individual reader find stories they like -- are we more author-driven in our reading habits? Conversely, how and why do particular stories "break out" and become more widely known? To what extent is the greater volume of material enabling -- and recognising -- a greater diversity of authors and topics? And what is the place of short fiction in today's field -- testing ground for ideas, the heart of the discussion, or something else?

Jetse de Vries (M), Abigail Nussbaum, Jonathan Strahan, Alvaro Zinos-Amaro, Elizabeth Bear

Zombies Run! New Ways of Understanding Games

Friday 13:30 - 15:00

Not all of us think of ourselves as gamers, yet it's quite likely that we've got a number of games or apps on our tablets and phones, or sneaking a quick game of solitaire between breaks. Purchases of games on apps are a huge part of gaming culture, yet many players don't like to be seen as 'gamers'. Perhaps this is because of the sterotypes that surround the image of the gamer, but app purchases also allow alternative groups of players and play style. This panel looks at app gaming, including the interactive running game, Zombies, Run! Writers and developers will discuss not only why Zombies, Run! has become such a success, but what this means in terms of the identity of the gamer.

Ciaran Roberts (M), Naomi Alderman, Elizabeth Bear, Andrea Phillips

Duelling by Starlight: The Joyful Poetry of Space Opera

Saturday 19:00 - 20:00

Space operas are stories of freedom: from the quotidian, or the logic of history, or the constraints of physics itself ... and, often, freedom of the imagination, freedom of the pen. It's sometimes said that the futures of space opera are fantastical, but when are they poetic? Consider the wit of Iain Banks' Culture, the baroque of Justina Robson's Natural History, or the ceaseless invention of Yoon Ha Lee's mythic tales: how do these writers, and others, use language and narrative structure to liberate and excite us? And in our liberation, what do these writers let us see more clearly?

Robert Reed, Jaine Fenn, Rosie Oliver, Adam Roberts, Elizabeth Bear, Hannu Rajaniemi

The Spies We (Still) Love

Sunday 10:00 - 11:00

From James Bond, UNCLE, and the (British!) Avengers to SHIELD and Person of Interest, the world of spies and conspiracy has long been a fixture of Western SF on screen. Yet there has always been ambivalence about such agents' real-world counterparts, and these days most of us have reservations about the extent of US/UK surveilance and big data manipulation. Bearing in mind this context, how have espionage stories evolved over the last forty years? Which shows and films have endured? And which modern examples are most artistically or politically successful, and why?

Nicholas Whyte (M), Elizabeth Bear, Colin Harvey, Gillian Redfearn, Stefanie Zurek


Tiptree Auction

Sunday 4:30-6:00

(Hosting)

matociquala: (writing whiskey wicked faerie)
Look what the cat dragged in!

Er, so to speak.




Magic City: Recent Spells, edited by Paula Guran!

“Paranormal Romance,” Christopher Barzak
“The Slaughtered Lamb,” Elizabeth Bear
“The Land of Heart’s Desire,” Holly Black
“Seeing Eye,” Patricia Briggs
“De la Tierra,” Emma Bull
“Curses,” Jim Butcher
“Dog Boys,” Charles de Lint
“Snake Charmer,” Amanda Downum
“Street Wizard,” Simon R. Green
“-30-,” Caitlín R. Kiernan
“Stone Man,” Nancy Kress
“Pearlywhite” Mark Laidlaw & John Shirley
“In the Stacks,” Scott Lynch
“Spellcaster 2.0,” Jonathan Maberry
“Kabu Kabu,” Nnedi Okorafor
“Stray Magic,” Diana Peterfreund
“The Woman Who Walked with Dogs,” Mary Rosenblum
“Wallamelon,” Nisi Shawl
“Grand Central Park,” Delia Sherman
“Words,” Angela Slatter
“Alchemy,” Lucy Sussex
“A Voice Like a Hole,” Catherynne M. Valente
“The Arcane Art of Misdirection,” Carrie Vaughn
“Thief of Precious Things,” A.C. Wise

More: http://www.prime-books.com/2014/01/27/magic-city-recent-spells-edited-by-paula-guran/#sthash.MPHfCTVQ.dpuf 

And now, back to my copy-edited manuscript, my DVD extra, my novel, my novella, my short story, and my RPG thingy. I think I'm overcommitted.
matociquala: (criminal minds bad shirt brigade)
"Abjure the Realm"--what was probably the very first published story (there was a complete mess of a trunk novella written in 1994. We don't talk about it.) set in the world that eventually developed into the Eternal Sky--is being reprinted in the forthcoming anthology Men In Impractical Armor... I mean, Warriors and Wizardry... along with a really impressive slate of others. Forthcoming November 11th!



(via Table of Contents: THE MAMMOTH BOOK OF WARRIORS AND WIZARDRY Edited by Sean Wallace - SF Signal)

Here’s the table of contents…

“Small Magic” by Jay Lake
“King Rainjoy’s Tears” by Chris Willrich
“A Rich Full Week” by K.J. Parker
“The Woman in Scarlet” by Tanith Lee
“Flotsam” by Bradley P. Beaulieu
“A Warrior’s Death” by Aliette de Bodard
“A Siege of Cranes” by Benjamin Rosenbaum
“Fox Bones. Many Uses.” by Alex Dally MacFarlane
“Where Virtue Lives” by Saladin Ahmed
“The Effigy Engine: A Tale of the Red Hats” by Scott Lynch
“Strife Lingers in Memory” by Carrie Vaughn
“A Sweet Calling” by Tony Pi
“The Necromancer” by N.K. Jemisin
“Golden Daughter, Stone Wife” by Benjanun Sriduangkaew
“Effigy Nights” by Yoon Ha Lee
“Wearaway and Flambeau” by Matthew Hughes
“At the Edge of Dying” by Mary Robinette Kowal
“Vici” by Naomi Novik
“Abjure the Realm” by Elizabeth Bear
“The Word of Azrael” by Matthew David Surridge
“Lady of the Ghost Willow” by Richard Parks
“The Singing Spear” by James Enge
“So Deep That the Bottom Could Not Be Seen” by Genevieve Valentine
“Warrior Dreams” by Cinda Williams Chima
“The Magician and the Maid and Other Stories” by Christie Yant
matociquala: (bad girls  mae west)
I come bearing reprint news! The hits keep coming!

Check out this awesome pile of books!




(Not pictured: Magic City: Recent Spells, edited by Paula Guran. Also, Notice how subtly I slip a plug for the Dozois/Martin edited Rogues in there, seeing as how my boyfriend has a story in it. Or possibly I'm just gloating over having scored an ARC.

Armageddon Rag is in the pile because I happen to be reading it currently.)

If you have a shortage of stuff to read, I can offer two (2) reprint stories in anthologies, a translation, and an essay to go with two (2) new stories in anthologies (as previously discussed) also coming out very shortly.

First off, a Swedish translation of "The Ghost Makers" is forthcoming in the online zine Einhorningen. I'm looking forward to that! Also, my essay "Dear Science Fiction, I'm Glad We Had This Talk," is being reprinted in the anthology Far Orbit, edited by Bascomb James. 

And! But! Also!

Here are a couple more ToCs to pique your interest.






Table of Contents (authors in alphabetical order):

“Paranormal Romance,” Christopher Barzak
“The Slaughtered Lamb,” Elizabeth Bear
“The Land of Heart’s Desire,” Holly Black
“Seeing Eye,” Patricia Briggs
“De la Tierra,” Emma Bull
“Curses,” Jim Butcher
“Dog Boys,” Charles de Lint
“Snake Charmer,” Amanda Downum
“Street Wizard,” Simon R. Green
“-30-,” Caitlín R. Kiernan
“Stone Man,”
Nancy Kress “Pearlywhite”
Mark Laidlaw & John Shirley
“In the Stacks,” Scott Lynch
“Spellcaster 2.0,” Jonathan Maberry
“Kabu Kabu,” Nnedi Okorafor
“Stray Magic,” Diana Peterfreund
“The Woman Who Walked with Dogs,” Mary Rosenblum”
“Wallamelon,” Nisi Shawl “Grand Central Park,” Delia Sherman
“Words,” Angela Slatter
“Alchemy,” Lucy Sussex
“A Voice Like a Hole,” Catherynne M. Valente
“The Arcane Art of Misdirection,” Carrie Vaughn
“Thief of Precious Things,” A.C. Wise





Table of Contents:

"Only the End of the World Again" by Neil Gaiman
"The Bleeding Shadow" by Joe R. Lansdale
"Love is Forbidden, We Croak & Howl" by Caitlín R. Kiernan
"Bulldozer" by Laird Barron
"A Quarter to Three" by Kim Newman
"Inelastic Collisions" by Elizabeth Bear
"That of Which We Speak When We Speak of the Unspeakable" by Nick Mamatas
"Red Goat Black Goat" by Nadia Bulkin
"Jar of Salts" and "Haruspicy" by Gemma Files
"Black is the Pit From Pole to Pole" by Howard Waldrop and Steven Utley
"I've Come to Speak with You Again" by Karl Edward Wagner
"The Sect of the Idiot" by Thomas Ligotti
"The Dappled Things" by William Browning Spencer
"The Same Deep Waters as You" by Brian Hodge
"Remnants" by Fred Chappell
"Waiting at the Cross Roads" by Steve Rasnic Tem
"Children of the Fang" by John Langan
matociquala: (rengeek player king)

I bring you publications and stuff!




THE BOOK OF SILVERBERG! Edited by Gardner Dozois and William Schaffer. Out next week. and full of stories and essays inspired by the work of Robert Silverberg. Including one by me!

Table of Contents

Greg Bear—A Tribute
Barry Malzberg—An Appreciation
Kage Baker—In Old Pidruid
Kristine Kathryn Rusch—Voyeuristic Tendencies
Mike Resnick—Bad News from the Vatican
Caitlin R.Kiernan—The Jetsam of Disremembered Mechanics
Connie Willis—Silverberg, Satan, and Me…
Elizabeth Bear—The Hand is Quicker
Nancy Kress—Eaters
James Patrick Kelly—The Chimp of the Popes
Tobias S. Buckell—Ambassador to the Dinosaurs

Publishers Weekly liked it a lot, and gave it a review which included the following: "Standouts include Mike Resnick’s “Bad News from the Vatican,” which follows up on the idea of a robot pope, and Elizabeth Bear’s “The Hand Is Quicker” which explores the nature of addiction and perception in a society obsessed with virtual reality." 

Lois Tilton at Locus reviewed it positively and says of my story, "...cynical move worthy of the master at his most depressing." (I have just been compared to Robert Silverberg and not found wanting. This is a career highlight.)

And Library Journal says, “Standouts include Connie Willis’s adorably weird ‘Silverberg, Satan, and Me or Where I Got the Idea for My Silverberg Story for this Anthology’ and Elizabeth Bear’s bleak future of false facades ‘The Hand is Quicker.’ …These stories will resonate most with readers familiar with Silverberg’s work, often being playful riffs on his famous stories or novels, but the tales can be enjoyed on their own merits as well.” [full review not available online]

Well done us, I'd say. It's available April 30th.



Also out soon--May 13th!--is DEAD MAN'S HAND, an anthology of Weird West tales edited by John Joseph Adams.

Table of Contents:

Introduction—John Joseph Adams
The Red-Headed Dead—Joe R. Lansdale
The Old Slow Man and His Gold Gun From Space—Ben H. Winters
Hellfire on the High Frontier—David Farland
The Hell-Bound Stagecoach—Mike Resnick
Stingers and Strangers—Seanan McGuire
Bookkeeper, Narrator, Gunslinger—Charles Yu
Holy Jingle—Alan Dean Foster
The Man With No Heart—Beth Revis
Wrecking Party—Alastair Reynolds
Hell from the East—Hugh Howey
Second Hand—Rajan Khanna
Alvin and the Apple Tree—Orson Scott Card
Madam Damnable’s Sewing Circle—Elizabeth Bear
Strong Medicine—Tad Williams
Red Dreams—Jonathan Maberry
Bamboozled—Kelley Armstrong
Sundown—Tobias S. Buckell
La Madre Del Oro—Jeffrey Ford
What I Assume You Shall Assume—Ken Liu
The Devil’s Jack—Laura Anne Gilman
The Golden Age—Walter Jon Williams
Neversleeps—Fred Van Lente
Dead Man’s Hand—Christie Yant

This includes my story "Madame Damnable's Sewing Circle," the seed that eventually grew into Karen Memory (out from Tor next year). So if you'd like a little foretaste of that--and tastes of the Weird West from all these other wonderful writers--here's a great opportunity to get in on the ground floor.

Publishers' Weekly is equally complimentary of this one, and calls my contribution "impeccably crafted." They've also got me gagging to read the Lansdale, Liu, and Williams contributions.

Squeee!

March 2017

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