May. 9th, 2013

matociquala: (criminal minds pentiss and reid back)
So let's talk about Charles Ramsey and Amanda Berry (and Gina DeJesus and Michelle Knight).

Let's talk about the fact that Amanda Berry is a hero, and that she rescued herself, her daughter, and two other women from a horrible situation.

Let the record show that she did what she had to do, and if she hadn't, those four women would still be in that house.

Because the media seem to want to cast her and the other women only as victims, and that narrative is a lie.

Let's talk about the fact that Charles Ramsey is a hero, too. Because he saw a person obviously in distress, and he acted. And the fact that that person was white and female, and that he was black and male, living on a job as a dishwasher, and that his police record would be brought up afterward, definitely entered his consciousness; and he did it anyway. Because he saw a person who needed help.

That does not decrease his heroism. It increases it.

Let the record show that he did what he had to do, and if he hadn't, those four women would still be in that house.

And Ariel Castro might be getting away with it for another fifteen years.

And now I'm speaking here as an abuse survivor.

That Mr. Ramsey allegedly has a record for domestic violence is not beside the point; it is the point. It's people who abuse other people, and it's people who help other people. And people can learn better, or make a mistake one time and do something to repair it another.

Ramsey doesn't have to be perfect to be a hero. Berry didn't have to be perfect to be a hero. Michelle Knight was a hero when she delivered Ms. Berry's baby daughter, with no experience and no support, and she doesn't have to be perfect for that to stand, either. Gina DeJesus has no doubt done some pretty heroic stuff in the last ten years or so as well.

Our absolutist cultural narratives do nobody a service. People do not have to be perfect and blameless to be worthy of respect and admiration; they only have to be trying.

And one of the effects of that absolutism is to tell survivors who are not perfect and blameless (and who is, and who who has been abused can see themselves as perfect?) then they are somehow villains too, or responsible, or that they bear guilt for what they've suffered.

Another effect is that people who are capable of making a change may not, because they are scared of how they will be perceived if they aren't perfect.

***

(As for Mr. Ramsey's drug charges: if you don't understand the interplay of race, class, and drug-law harassment, I suggest you do some reading, and understand that middle class suburban white people can get away with a lot more than some black guy from Cleveland.)
matociquala: (me at wfc)

I have my first pair of new glasses since 2009. I can see leaves on trees! And freckles on the lovely person who helped fit my glasses!

In other news, I am apparently nominated for four separate Locus awards in four separate Locus award categories: Novella, novelette, short story, and collection. All three of the short fiction offerings are available in their entirety, for free, online. You may read them here, if you like:

Novella: "In the House of Aryaman, a Lonely Signal Burns"

Novelette: "Faster Gun"

Short Story: "The Deeps of the Sky"

Congrats to all the other nominees! Here's the complete list:

SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL

  • The Hydrogen Sonata, Iain M. Banks (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance, Lois McMaster Bujold (Baen)
  • Caliban’s War, James S.A. Corey (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • 2312, Kim Stanley Robinson (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • Redshirts, John Scalzi (Tor; Gollancz)

FANTASY NOVEL

  • The Killing Moon, N.K. Jemisin (Orbit US; Orbit UK)
  • The Drowning Girl, Caitlín R. Kiernan (Roc)
  • Glamour in Glass, Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor)
  • Hide Me Among the Graves, Tim Powers (Morrow; Corvus)
  • The Apocalypse Codex, Charles Stross (Ace; Orbit UK)

YOUNG ADULT BOOK

  • The Drowned Cities, Paolo Bacigalupi (Little, Brown; Atom)
  • Pirate Cinema, Cory Doctorow (Tor Teen)
  • Railsea, China Miéville (Del Rey; Macmillan)
  • Dodger, Terry Pratchett (Harper; Doubleday UK)
  • The Girl Who Fell Beneath Fairyland and Led the Revels There, Catherynne M. Valente (Feiwel and Friends; Much-in-Little ’13)

FIRST NOVEL

  • Throne of the Crescent Moon, Saladin Ahmed (DAW; Gollancz ’13)
  • vN, Madeline Ashby (Angry Robot US; Angry Robot UK)
  • Seraphina, Rachel Hartman (Random House; Doubleday UK)
  • The Games, Ted Kosmatka (Del Rey; Titan)
  • Alif the Unseen, G. Willow Wilson (Grove; Corvus)

NOVELLA

  • “In the House of Aryaman, a Lonely Signal Burns”, Elizabeth Bear (Asimov’s 1/12)
  • On a Red Station, Drifting, Aliette de Bodard (Immersion)
  • After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall, Nancy Kress (Tachyon)
  • “The Stars Do Not Lie”, Jay Lake (Asimov’s 10-11/12)
  • The Boolean Gate, Walter Jon Williams (Subterranean)

NOVELETTE

  • “Faster Gun”, Elizabeth Bear (Tor.com 8/12)
  • “The Girl-Thing Who Went Out for Sushi”, Pat Cadigan (Edge of Infinity)
  • “Close Encounters”, Andy Duncan (The Pottawatomie Giant & Other Stories)
  • “Fake Plastic Trees”, Caitlín R. Kiernan (After)
  • “The Lady Astronaut of Mars”, Mary Robinette Kowal (Rip-Off!)

SHORT STORY

  • “The Deeps of the Sky”, Elizabeth Bear (Edge of Infinity)
  • “Immersion”, Aliette de Bodard (Clarkesworld 6/12)
  • “Mantis Wives”, Kij Johnson (Clarkesworld 8/12)
  • “Elementals”, Ursula K. Le Guin (Tin House Fall ’12)
  • “Mono No Aware”, Ken Liu (The Future Is Japanese)

ANTHOLOGY

  • After, Ellen Datlow & Terri Windling, eds. (Hyperion)
  • The Year’s Best Science Fiction: Twenty-ninth Annual Collection, Gardner Dozois, ed. (St. Martin’s Griffin; Robinson as The Mammoth Book of Best New SF 25)
  • The Future Is Japanese, Nick Mamatas & Masumi Washington, eds. (Haikasoru)
  • Edge of Infinity, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Solaris US; Solaris UK)
  • The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Six, Jonathan Strahan, ed. (Night Shade)

COLLECTION

  • The Best of Kage Baker, Kage Baker (Subterranean)
  • Shoggoths in Bloom, Elizabeth Bear (Prime)
  • At the Mouth of the River of Bees, Kij Johnson (Small Beer)
  • The Unreal and the Real: Selected Stories Volume One: Where on Earth and Volume Two: Outer Space, Inner Lands, Ursula K. Le Guin (Small Beer)
  • The Dragon Griaule, Lucius Shepard (Subterranean)

MAGAZINE

  • Asimov’s
  • F&SF
  • Tor.com
  • Clarkesworld
  • Subterranean

PUBLISHER

  • Tor
  • Subterranean Press
  • Orbit
  • Baen
  • Angry Robot

EDITOR

  • John Joseph Adams
  • Ellen Datlow
  • Gardner Dozois
  • Jonathan Strahan
  • Ann & Jeff VanderMeer

ARTIST

  • Donato Giancola
  • Stephan Martiniere
  • John Picacio
  • Shaun Tan
  • Michael Whelan

NON-FICTION

  • An Exile on Planet Earth, Brian Aldiss (Bodleian Library)
  • Science Fiction: The 101 Best Novels 1985-2010, Damien Broderick & Paul Di Filippo, eds. (NonStop)
  • Distrust That Particular Flavor, William Gibson (Putnam)
  • The Cambridge Companion to Fantasy Literature, Edward James & Farah Mendlesohn, eds. (Cambridge University Press)
  • Some Remarks, Neal Stephenson (Morrow)

ART BOOK

  • Spectrum 19: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art, Cathy Fenner & Arnie Fenner, eds. (Underwood)
  • Trolls, Brian Froud & Wendy Froud (Abrams)
  • Tarzan: The Centennial Celebration, Scott Tracy Griffin (Titan)
  • J.R.R. Tolkien: The Art of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien, Wayne G. Hammond & Christina Scull, eds. (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)
  • Steampunk: An Illustrated History, Brian J. Robb (Aurum)

And I'm interviewed at Amazon's Omnivoracious regarding the awards.

Excelsior!

March 2017

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